A Rising Tide Lifts All Transit

by phildini on March 11, 2016


One of the most common concerns I hear about Alameda growing as a city is the congestion at our bridges and tunnels, and the difficulty people have getting on and off the island. To me, it feels like we need a comprehensive plan that increases public transit access and thinks about access to and from Alameda in terms of the whole island and the whole region. Public transit is critical if Alamedans want to maintain the quality of life the island has to offer.

The speakers at Wednesday night's City of Alameda Democratic Club meeting agree that public transit is essential. Speakers from all the transit agencies that serve Alameda spoke in turn about what they're doing already to serve the area, and how they would like to improve.

  • BART has about 430000 riders every weekday, riding on an infrastructure that was built in the 70s, and in train cars that are about as old. They want to spend 9.6 billion in improvements, mostly in purchases of new train cars and infrastructure improvements.
  • BART has about half the money they're looking for, and will most likely be putting a parcel tax or a bond measure on the ballot in November for the other half.
  • AC Transit has about 179000 riders every weekday, mostly people going to work and schoolchildren. Schoolchildren alone make up 30k of their riders. AC Transit's main goal is to increase service by working closely with the City of Alameda; they're expanding lines that run through the city and collaborating on a city transit plan.
  • AC Transit hopes to improve its service and its fleet with the funds it already has, although they are also investigating a parcel tax.
  • The Water Emergency Transportation Authority (WETA, the agency in charge of the San Francisco Bay Ferries) sees Alameda as its greatest-service city, and wants to deepen its commitment to Alameda by building a maintenance facility and another terminal on the Southwest side of Alameda.
  • WETA knows that transit to the terminals, as well as parking at the terminals, is the greatest challenge their ridership faces; they're hoping for stronger collaboration with the other agencies and the city to make it easier to get to the existing Alameda ferry terminals.
  • The West Alameda Transportation Demand Management Association (TMA) is running a series of apparently ridiculously successful shuttles from the West End of Alameda to 12th St. BART in Oakland, and wants to see their service expand as well. 
  • TMA's main focus right now seems to be on education, getting Alamedans, Alameda businesses, and the employees of Alameda businesses thinking about public transit options and how we can all better utilize public transit.

It was an information-dense first half of a meeting, to say the least. The major takeaways for me were:

  • Public transportation is on the up in Alameda, and many want to see it increase.
  • The transit agencies see themselves in cooperation, not competition. They understand their inter-connectedness to each other, and seem to want each other to thrive.
  • They're all trying to buy American and bring jobs to Alameda.

As I am unabashedly in favor of more public transit, I'm thrilled to hear about the programs currently in place, and that those programs are trying to expand. I want Alameda to be more walkable, and bikable, and I want public transit to be a deeply viable option to owning a car in Alameda.

I said above that public transit is critical to the quality of life for current Alamedans, and it will be just as critical for future Alamedans. The second half of the meeting was dedicated to presentations from property developers, specifically the organizations behind the Del Monte project, the Encinal Terminals project, and the Alameda Point Site A project.

I'm not going to go too much into the projects here, mostly because I don't have hard numbers like I have with the transit agencies, and partially because growth in Alameda, and in the Bay Area, is a thorny subject. I think more growth is good for Alameda, and I think these projects have a shot at being a massive net positive to the city. Others feel differently.

What I can say is that both projects feel public transit is a critical need for their developments to succeed, and both are putting plans in place to improve transit in their development. The group in charge of Del Monte/Encinal Terminals seems a bit more on the ball in this regard, as they talked about having an organization like the TMA (potentially joined with the TMA) to continually improve transit in that part of the city, but both groups stressed how transit would be integral to what they're building.

I've talked so far about increasing public transit because it will ease congestion, and make Alameda an even better place to live. But there's another benefit of public transit that the Alameda Point Site A group drove home for me: Getting cars off the road.

The plan for Alameda Point Site A includes raising the level of some streets and buildings, and a terraced waterfront park area. Why? Because global warming has become enough of a reality that property developers are working "sea level rise strategies" into their plans. They're so certain the seas will rise from global warming that they're betting money on it. 

Every train car BART adds, every bus or shuttle added by AC Transit or TMA, every ferry added by WETA gets cars off the road and less CO2 in our atmosphere. In a world where major corporations are now banking on global warming happening, increased public transit in Alameda can't come soon enough.